Friday, April 30, 2010


Posted by Fashion Editor at Large

Jean Shrimpton in an Italian Vogue edition from 1962

At the end of the shows I was busy compiling my trend report as usual when the 60's trend came up on my radar. It was done best at the Parisian House of Rochas, designed by Marco Zanini, but  Balenciaga, Prada and Giles had a go too. It got me to wondering what exact moment of the 1960's had inspired the look, and mulled over who the muse might be. Jean Shrimpton? Jackie Kennedy? Brigitte Bardot? None of them felt right and I couldn't pin it down. It's here I have to hand it to the British High Street design teams and buyers. They know how to spin a trend and give it the shape they want for their customer base. On the way they sometimes manage make a trend ten times better than it seemed on the catwalk.

The 60's trend is a case in point. My Eureka moment hit at Urban Outfitters when I became enthralled by their Cambridge Satchel link-up (below), the shearling lined hiking bootees, the Harris tweed satchel collaboration, and the cute way they paired flecky grandad cardigans, plaid shirts, kilts, and yet more satchels. It was then I knew who the muse was for this whole darn trend... here she is...
Carey Mulligan just before she meets her man in An Education, set in 1962 
Cambridge Satchel

Urban Outfitters gets inspiration from Carey Mulligan in An Education and the English university style of the early 60's

New Look AW10

TopShop AW10

Lynn Barber: the real thing. I LOVE this book.

Of course, the film is set in 1962. Turns out this is the same year Tom Ford's film A Single Man is set. This put me on a trail for other significant cultural events from 1962 and following a a sixty minute journey through the Web I feel totally inspired.
Don't so many guys have this look today? Julieanne Moore could make each Rochas AW10 look her own.


YSL launches

The beautiful Yves Saint Laurent in 1962

Bob Dylan first album

 Francoise Hardy is (in my opinion) the sexiest woman in the world in 1962
These photgraphs are taken:

Photo credits: FEAL, Photobucket


Posted by Fashion Editor at Large

British Fashion lost a heartland member of its ranks on Wednesday night. Katy Baggott, 39, the agent to Phoebe Philo, Juergen Teller and Katie Hillier among others over the years, has left us. Tonight I am attending the 40th birthday party of her best friend since the age of 14, Sammi, who has told me the party will be bringing all of her friends together, and that the evening is dedicated to celebrating her life.
Katy Baggott with Juergen Teller at Marc Jacobs SS10 show last September in NYC.

"Katy Baggott, agent extraordinaire, tragically and unexpectedly passed away yesterday, Wednesday 28 April, in her sleep. Baggot was one of those hugely influential and yet oft-unsung heroes of the fashion industry, a force of nature and enthusiasm. She was an agent who chose to work very closely with a small and hugely talented roster, her directness and honesty helping her to skilfully negotiate commercial contracts for her clients that gave them enough room to maintain their own character and style. She was unstinting in her loyalty, generosity and kindness to her friends as well as randomly helping anyone she was impressed by along the way with a simple introduction or recommendation. All that aside, Katy was great fun to be with and will be horribly missed by so many."
photo: Retna Pictures

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

A Few Words To Say

Hello guys, how you doing? Hopefully you are all doing great!
I actually just wanted to say, THANKS SO MUCH for those who voted for me. Totally appreciate it!
Plus, so sorry that I've been neglecting this blog. Found myself been so busy catching up with the deadline. I promise I will post some exciting stuff in the coming days.
Have a wonderful day!

Sloup on Marketplace

Marketplace, Monday, April 19, 2010
Dinner parties help fund arts projects
Amelia Colette Jones and Maggie Ginestra
Public funding for the arts has been hurt by the downturn, so local groups have turned to small-scale private donors to offer micro-grants for starving artists. David Weinberg reports.

Monday, April 26, 2010

Rhizome Interview with Jeff Hnilicka of FEAST

 Rhizome  Interview with Jeff Hnilicka of FEAST 

By Jenny Jaskey on Friday, February 5th, 2010 at 1:00 pm. 

As the second part of a series on art, labor, and politics, I spoke with Jeff Hnilicka of FEAST, a Brooklyn-based community dinner that funds the work of emerging artists. FEAST will be hosting their next meal tomorrow evening, February 6, from 5-8 p.m. at Church of the Messiah, 129 Russell St, Brooklyn NY. The event is open to the public. - Jenny Jaskey

What is FEAST and how did you begin?
Jeff Hnilicka: FEAST has been going on for a little over a year and runs out of a church basement in Greenpoint. There are around twenty people who help facilitate it. We come from the art world, food world, and design world, and we are connected to ideas of collectivism and immediacy – things like zines, living room dance parties, bike rides, and dinners. Many of us are also involved with Hit Factorie, an artist collective.

FEAST grew out of our desire to investigate the collapse of cultural production in the face of emerging sustainable food production systems that were successful.

Sunday, April 25, 2010

State of The Arts

State of The Arts The Present Group

Art:21 - WAGE Against the Machine

Art:21  "W.A.G.E Against the Machine"
April 27th, 2009

Last September, as part of Creative Time’s Democracy in America: The National Campaign event at the Park Avenue Armory, activist group Working Artists and the Greater Economy (W.A.G.E.) stumped for the rights of artists to be compensated fairly for their labor by art institutions in the United States. The economy has taken a bigger hit since then, which makes W.A.G.E.’s work even more important. The Brooklyn-based collective was formed in 2008 by artists A.L. Steiner, K8 Hardy, and A.K. Burns, and the group’s expanding membership includes artists, performers, independent curators, and all others who share their cause. W.A.G.E. cites exemplar, working models beyond our borders overseas and overhead—organizations such as the Canadian Artists’ Representation / Le Front des artistes canadiens (CARFAC), whose efforts resulted in the 1988 Canadian Artists’ Representation Copyright Collective (CARCC), which legally established a fee schedule for artists to be paid every time their work is exhibited at a gallery, museum, or institution that receives federal funds.


Posted by Fashion Editor at Large

This image is the copyright of Melanie Rickey and The Fashion Editor at Large blog. Not to be used without permission.

From a purely fashion/clothing/style based perspective, it is a most fascinating thing to be getting married to another woman in a Civil Partnership Ceremony, as the proper jargon dictates we call it. As two women with long-standing fashion-related careers it is a given that we are expected to pull something totes fabulous out of the bag. But what?

From the off I knew the consideration for how our two looks would work together had to be paramount. None of that "keeping it secret" from your partner business. What we wear has to work together. The outfits have to complement without being too similar, bring out the best in each individual, and pull us together visually as a couple too. And they MUST BE UTTERLY FABULOUS. Must must must...

Another thing that we keep being asked is "which one of you will wear the trouser suit."  I'm not stupid, I do know there is an element of humour to this question. However, I think the hint of mirth added to the timbre of the voice of the questioner is there because they want it to SOUND like they are joking, but meanwhile they are serious. They think that in girl-girl couples there is always one who wears the trousers. Well FYI: we are both partial to a jazzy new-look Balenciaga bootcut, but not on our wedding day, thanks.

The precedence of Ellen Degeneres in a white trouser suit and Portia di Rossi in a beautiful meringue wedding dress on their big day has been set, more's the pity. I'm convinced the union of Ellen and Portia gave rise to the above snapshot of us which was taken by the wonderful Caroline Burstein of Browns Bride on our first day of "what are we going to wear to get married" shopping.

Full of naive hope that the whole process would be easy, I booked us an appointment for an hour long trying on session at Browns Bride, thinking we would find roomfuls of cocktail wedding dresses that would look amazing on us. What planet was I on? Wedding dresses are SOOO not us. When we got there and saw the wonderful weddingy drama of the exquisite but very trad frocks the reality that we needed a whole other approach to to this thing clunked on our heads like a barrier in a car-park.

Don't get me wrong. If I was a bride in the traditional sense and marrying a man, I would have fallen at the feet of Caroline B and let her guide me to the nearest Oscar de la Renta, Marchesa, Akira or Galliano for Christian Dior masterpiece. However, we are about as untrad as it is possible to be on the wedding front. So it was with unbridled camp glee that we slung on the beautiful bias cut bridal sheaths suggested by Caroline, "just so you have a memory of the visit". I am eternally grateful for that. Everytime I see the snapshot, I laugh at how wrongheaded we were on the start of our wedding dress journey.

Things are looking much better now. I STILL have not totally got my dress sorted, but lets say I have a world class designer on the case and Yasmin Sewell on hand to keep me sane.

Now that I've broken the ice on discussing my CPC with you, I feel so much better. Might as well let you in on a few other secrets as I go along.

I will introduce you to my personal trainer this week. She is hardcore.  

With thanks to Browns Bride. 
The Browns Bride dresses are by Elizabeth Fillmore.
Thanks to for the Ellen and Portia shot. 

Friday, April 23, 2010


Posted by Fashion Editor at Large

My very dear friend Yasmin Sewell has been curating the Estethica press day for a couple of years now. Last season I got there just as they were packing up. Cue guilt trip. So with my sense of journalistic duty front of mind, I skipped along to Estethica after we, (me and Yasmin, who is advising me and the g/f on our wedding looks), left the showroom of the designer who is charged with making us look amazing on the day. And no, I still have not decided on a wedding dress, though Mary has, and she looks so amazing in it. Grrr.
Loved Yaz's look yesterday. Hat from Amsterdam, jacket, coat and jeans by Margiela, shirt by ACNE, TopShop shoes, Roger Vivier Bag. Paper bag from Whole Foods contained nachos and guacamole, yum!

ANYWAY. Turned up at Somerset House to check out the group of ethical designers selected by the British Fashion Council, with their collections edited for the press by Yasmin, and finally to observe a panel discussion on the future of ethical fashion. I was interested to hear what progress was being made in creating awareness of ethical labels, and how the companies are doing on a business level. But before I knew what was happening, I was inserted into the panel representing Grazia due to Volcano absenteeism. YIKES!

 The view

Yasmin and Laura Bailey

 The PANEL: Laura Bailey, Verra Budimlija planning director of thinktank G2, Orsola de Castro owner/designer of upcycling label From Somewhere, Baroness Lola Young arts & heritage consultant and independent cross bench peer in the House of Lords. Out of shot is Charty Durrant, fashion consultant.

Brain in gear, I reacquainted myself with my thoughts on the subject. My view on ethical fashion is that something has to happen to rectify the disconnect between fashion seasons and actual seasons. Winter coats in on sale in September and bikinis on rails in March are an accepted shopping norm, but should they be? We also need to question a system that demands of designers they produce two main seasonal catwalk collections, as well as two pre-collections annually. High street stores produced a new range every six weeks. It was these points that revved the discussion into gear. 

What we were all agreed on across the panel, is that awareness of ethical fashion/clothes needs to be fostered in teenagers. We also agreed that educating young consumers to develop personal style, rather than chasing fashion trends would be beneficial to everyone.

For me, what emerged from the panel discussion is that it is a darn good thing there are a bunch of people out there trying to make a difference to the way we think about and consume clothing. We need the London College of Fashion and its Centre for Sustainable Fashion. We need the British Fashion Council and Estethica. We need the designers selected for Esthetica to start making a difference, and to get recognition and exposure in the fashion press. Most especially though, we need them to make clothes that are desirable which stand up as stylish, functional, practical, beautiful - whatever they intend for them to be - but in the wider market. Not in an ethical market.
Christopher Raeburn creates functional outerwear using reclaimed, second-hand army fabrics, including leather and parachute silks. 

The better ethical designers get at looking as good as the rest, (like Christopher's work above), but with the added edge of green credentials, the more likely we are to see the movement growing. It is the future. Stella McCartney has shown that you don't need to use leather to create amazing accessories. Edun has shown that you can create your own supply chain by growing cotton, and educating and caring for your workforce. There are manifold ways to be ethical.

On a personal, philosophical level I don't believe in consumption for consumptions sake. I find it sinister that we should be encouraged to keep shopping (J.G Ballard's Kingdom Come anyone?) So Primark, Peacocks and Tesco clothing lines are not on my shoppping list. I only buy what I need. But I DO want to support designers who are trying to educate people by creating ethical clothing in whatever form that might come in whether it is non-chrome vegetable dyes for leather; rearing their own sheep and knitting jumpers from them; upcycling, recycling, remaking..

I do find it difficult to find amazing ethical pieces for the magazine at times, but the selection on show for AW10 gave me hope.

Baroness Young was right when she stated "when things change, the two ways need to co-exist for a while."
From Somewhere uses off-cuts from the design process and upcycles them into beautiful pieces, like this one. Established in 1997 it is one of the pioneers of of the UK sustainable fashion movement. IThe clothes it creates improve season-on-season. 

Loved this "Madonna" dress in 93% Bamboo fibres by MAXJENNY, they are worth checking out

Carapace gauntlet by Makepiece

Phyllite jumper by Makepiece

Edgeway dress by Makepiece

Here is Beate Kubitz of Makepiece with the sheep that make the above garments! She co-owns the label with designer Nicola Sherlock-Windle, and all of their well-designed - some fashionable, others functional - knits are created using British farmed wool, alpaca, and mohair.
Meet Nin Castle of Goodone. Her energy and flair was infectious, and Yasmin told me she could see Goodone going all the way. Nin designs using upcycled surplus luxury fabrics and used garments, she also makes use of end of roll cashmere and British knit. The designer is posing with a mannequin wearing her bestselling and very sexy crochet panel knit dress. Her next project is a collection using all the surplus fabrics from Arcadia Group for a TopShop collection. Watch this space!

Photos by Fashion Editor at Large and from the press packs of designers shown.

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

Tuesday, April 20, 2010


Posted by Fashion Editor at Large

When you feel like everything has changed it is reassuring to see that some things stay the same. This was Paris Hilton bouncing around at Coachella in CA. this past weekend. I promise you this is not from 2006.
I don't have time to dwell on why, but seeing the carefree debauchery from the hundreds of pictures I've viewed from Coachella in the last 24 hours, got me to thinking about one of my favourite quotes from John Updike, one of my preferred authors. This is him on himself, and pretty much sums up the human condition for me today.

"For all my physical handicaps, neurotic symptoms, aberrant thought patterns, and characterological limitations, I think of myself as an amiable, reasonable, interested, generally healthy, sexually normal, dependable, hopeful, fortunate human being. Which goes to show what a vexed thing even a fortunate human being is."

Photos: Thanks to Rex Features.  

Sunday, April 18, 2010

Walk by Faith..

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What I Wore:

Stripes sheer outerwear : (X)SML
Dual-tone top : Pusdai Friday Market Rp.10.000 ($1)
Dream-catcher necklace : gift from my besty
Acid-washed leggings : Unbranded
Vintage leather shoes : Etienne Aigner (gift from my dad)

...not by sight!
( 2 Corinthians 5:7)

Friday, April 16, 2010

A Little Peek

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What I Wore :
Lacey Top : Pasar Senen Rp.5.000 (less than $1)
Asymmetric outerwear : Flashy
Shiny leggings : TRF
Strappy wooden heels : Wimo at Centro

Anyway, I'd like to share you a little peek into this adorable lookbook from Keller's Spring/Summer 2010 Collection

Oh! I just love every single one of them!

go check out the whole collection here